I'm a Steward. I'm aware. I care. I act.
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We are happy to inform you that, like the big schools in Metro Manila (Ateneo, Xavier), we just received the DepEd approval for our incoming Grades 4-9 to skip 1 year from the K to 12 curriculum since we have always offered a 12-yr program with focus on science and math.

 

This will save our families time and resources. Come to an orientation on this program on May 10 at 9-11 AM at our AVR.

CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK of

“Making a Better World Possible through a

Spirituality of Stewardship”

Theme for School Year 2013 – 2014

 

by: Romel Obinario

Background

 

In its 2012 Yearend Economic and Political Briefing, IBON Foundation noted that “the year 2012 ended with the Philippines seemingly moving forward on many counts. There was rapid economic growth, record highs in the stock market and gross international reserves (GIR), looming investment grade credit ratings, higher foreign investment and increasing corporate profits. The political scene was also relatively steady especially compared to the decade of turbulence during the previous Arroyo administration. In particular the traditional political opposition was restrained and as yet unwilling to test the administration’s perceived core of public support. There were also apparent advances in some controversial pieces of legislation and, notably, even in the Moro armed conflict in Mindanao.”

 

The rapid economic growth was affirmed when, on 31 January 2013, the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) released the national accounts data, saying that “the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) grew by 6.8 percent in the fourth quarter of 2012, paving the way for the full-year GDP estimate to post a broad-based growth of 6.6 percent.” With these figures, 2012 was a banner year for the Philippine economy as it registered the fastest growth in the ASEAN region, and was second only to China in the whole of Asia.

 

“Yet,” IBON argues, “many things which were arguably more meaningful remained unchanged. Despite supposed economic good news and a degree of political stability the majority of Filipinos still faced record joblessness, stagnant earnings, rising prices and growing poverty. Domestic manufacturing and agriculture continued their long-term decline.”

 

These observations are validated by the government’s own data. The NSCB reported that poverty incidence remained unchanged as of the First Semester 2012, as indicated by the Family Income and Expenditure Survey. The official poverty rate was 28%, meaning that approximately 35 million Filipinos are poor, living with just P52 or less a day. Contributing to this is the record joblessness of approximately 4.42 million Filipinos, the highest since 1998, and 7.5 million underemployed.

 

It is no wonder then that the income gap between the rich and poor is widening. The combined annual income (Php 343 billion) of the top 1% (125,000 families) is equal to the income of the poorest 30% or 5,500,000 poorest families. The combined net worth of the 25 richest Filipinos (US$ 21.4 billion) is equal to the combined income of the 11,100,000 poorest families.

 

When we look at the list of candidates in the 2013 mid-term elections, the same old surnames appear on the slates of both the government and the opposition, whether at the national or local levels. It would not be far-fetched to say that two sets of siblings, plus a bunch of old names belonging to well-entrenched political dynasties, will represent us in the Senate, prompting IBON’s observation that the “old disagreeable political ways (will) continue.”

 

 According to IBON, “the administration and its supporters have played up the onset of ‘good governance’ in the country and supposed economic progress. However the two-and-a-half years so far of profits without prosperity, persistence of undemocratic politics, and dearth of fundamental pro-people reforms has affirmed the country’s duality: a Philippines for the rich and another for the poor. There is still no development and economic gains are shallow or merely financial and speculative. There has also not yet been anything approaching the major changes needed to improve the country’s political system.”

 

IBON further notes: “There are also shorter-term flashpoints: repressed political rivalries could erupt around the May 2013 elections on any number of issues, a renewed push for charter change could yet be divisive despite administration efforts to build consensus, the MILF-GPH peace process could become very controversial with discord among Moro groups or even between the parties to the peace deal, and military tensions could rapidly escalate in the disputed waters of the West Philippine Sea (South China Sea).”

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    Making a Better World Possible through a Spirituality of Stewardship

     

    Under these circumstances, there is a need for genuine social transformation. We cannot sit back and watch in the sidelines while old political interests and repressive economic policies that bring about massive poverty and inequality continue to hound the Filipino people. As stewards who understand our country’s and people’s problems and are concerned in changing the abject situation, we need to take concrete steps to address these concerns.

     

    LBAS is cognizant of the fact that the world we live in today is not an ideal world. A world where poverty and inequality exists; where people are denied their economic, political, cultural, and social rights; where wanton destruction of the environment prevails; and where justice and peace are still elusive dreams, is simply not the world we should be living in.

     

    LBAS believes that this world should be transformed. And so, since its tenth foundation anniversary celebration in 2007, LBAS has joined the participants of the World Social Forum in their battle cry “Another World is Possible.” Along this battle cry was formulated the themes of the past school years. In SY 2009 – 2010, the institution’s theme was “Making a Better World Possible through Gender-Fair Education.” This was followed by “Making a Better World Possible through Democracy Building and Human Rights Education” in SY 2010 – 2011, and “Making a Better World Possible through a Spirituality of Stewardship” in SY 2011 – 2012. In order to put into focus the looming global economic crisis, the theme for SY 2012 – 2013, the theme was “Making a Better World Possible through Stewardship in a Continuing Global Economic Crisis.”

     

     

     

    For SY 2013 – 2014, LBAS is once again adopting “Making a Better World Possible through a Spirituality of Stewardship” as its theme.

     

    In adopting Spirituality of Stewardship as its theme, the school seeks to focus on (1) concrete practices of LBAS spirituality; (2) defining the LBAS identity and practicing an LBAS culture; and (3) the transformative nature of stewardship.

     

    ON SPIRITUALITY

     

    Quotes on Spirituality from Fr. Toots’ Presentation

    Spirituality is simply the spirit of the subject, be it an individual or a group, in its relationship to the whole reality. (Fr. Jon Sobrino, SJ)

     

    Spirituality is the “experience of consciously striving to integrate one’s life in terms not of isolation and self-absorption but of self- transcendence toward the ultimate value one perceives.” (Sr. Sandra M. Schneiders, IMH)

     

    Indigenous spirituality is very much connected with the land, with people…The indigenous people are very much connected with the land as the land touches the very core of their existence.  It is tied down to their own way of life, customs and traditions as well as tribal religion.  For them, the land is to be shared.

     

    Quotes From an Expanded MANCOM Discussion on Spirituality of Stewardship

     

    3 Elements of Spirituality:

    1. Spirituality is what we give value to, the thing(s) that is (are) so important that we give our lives to

             them.

    2. Spirituality is a lived experience. It is not what we believe in but what we actually live.

    3. Spirituality leads to transformation in ourselves and, consequently, in the ones we touch.

     

    Belairian spirituality is therefore our day-to-day life as a community. It is the coming together of our lived experiences as we keep in touch with ourselves, with the whole of humanity, and with the whole of creation. In the process, we are transformed and so is the world around us.

     

    It is the fusion of the positive emotions that bind us together as members of an educational institution working for youth formation, human values transmission, and societal transformation (i.e., our educational philosophy).

     

    Belairian spirituality is rooted in our indigenous beliefs and different faith traditions. It springs from the belief that God – the divine; a power greater than ourselves - moves in all of us, guiding us in our relationship with others and with the whole of reality. It builds on and is supplementary to our beliefs and that of our families.

     

    Through Belairian spirituality, we come to know ourselves in interdependent relation to the world. We learn to live as radically responsive to the needs and desires of others as we come to see ourselves as integrally connected. We go beyond ourselves to nourish the growth and well-being of each and every member of the LBAS community and beyond.

     

    Belairian spirituality is expressed in a number of interrelated instrumental values: faith in God, family solidarity, gratitude, compassion, and transformation.

    These five instrumental values of our spirituality can be further broken down into smaller and easier to apply concepts.

    FAITH IN GOD

    • Belief in God’s Undying and Unconditional Love

    • Forgiveness, Reconciliation, and God’s Saving Grace

    • Patience and Trust

    • Surrender

    • Respect and Tolerance

    • Prayer

    FAMILY SOLIDARITY

    • Close Family Ties

    • Family as the Source of Strength and Inspiration

    • Responsibility and Sacrifice

    COMPASSION

    • Sacrifice for the Sake of Others

    • Selflessness/Sharing What You Have

    • Service

    This is the collation of the Workshops on Spirituality of the different areas and clusters held in March & May 2011.

    GRATITUDE

    • Humility

    • Giving Back

    TRANSFORMATION

    • Introspection and Self-Realization

    • Self-transcendence

    • Unity with the Whole of Creation

    • Solidarity

    ON STEWARDSHIP

     

    Quotes on Stewardship from a Memo from Ms. Mercy

    Stewardship is defined as “the careful and responsible management of something entrusted to one’s care.”

     

    “As stewards, we receive God’s gifts gratefully, cultivate them responsibly, share them lovingly in justice with others, and return them with increase to the Lord.”

     

    Living as good stewards of God’s gifts will satisfy the deepest, strongest longings of your heart. It will fill you with joy, happiness, satisfaction. Stewards know the meaning of life – and make real sacrifices the make the world a better place – making their own lives better in the process.”

    Quotes from the LBAS PowerPoint Presentation on Stewardship

    Who is a Catholic steward? A steward is someone “who receives God’s gifts gratefully, cherishes and tends them in a responsible and accountable manner, shares them in justice and love with all, and returns them with increase to the Lord.” (Pastoral Letter of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops, 1992)

     

    The steward, or “keeper of the hall”, was the official in a medieval household responsible for its management. Under the feudal system, it was the lord who had all of the legal authority. The steward had only a delegation of that authority, and a mandate to administer the estate. His stewardship of the estate was all-inclusive, from the broadest policies to the most trivial details. For the estate to function properly, the steward needed to hold himself accountable for all that took place in the household.

    Stewardship is the assumption of responsibility for the welfare of the world. It is the inclination which leads some part of the world to care for the whole; Stewardship is the mantle under which operate all of the progressive causes ― human rights, conservation, economic welfare, government reform and oversight, education, health care, disaster relief, animal welfare, mental health, peace.

    (From: http://the-stewardship.org/stewardship.htm )

     

    Instrumental Values of Stewardship

    • Gratitude

    • Accountability

    • Generosity of Spirit

    • Commitment to Change

     

    Stewardship is at the CORE of our core values. It can be referred to as the “mother” of our core values, the value on which all our core values are anchored.

     

    When we say we are stewards for a better world, we mean that we are STEWARDS:

    ▪ for our students, our co-employees, and for our own lives;

    ▪ for our country and our people;

    ▪ for democracy and human rights;

    ▪ for the poor in life and in spirit;

    ▪ for the world and the international community;

    ▪ for the environment; and,

    ▪ for our faith and our church.

     

    We perform different stewardship roles. Here are just some examples of the multitude of roles we can play as Belairian stewards:

    ▪ as competent and creative students and employees, we strive to be the best in our fields;

    ▪ as consummate artists, we assert our national identity through the things we create;

    ▪ as nationalists and freedom fighters, we endeavor to protect and defend our hard-won freedom;

    ▪ as diplomats and bridge-builders, we make every effort to work for prosperity and world peace;

    ▪ as defenders of democracy, we struggle to oppose tyranny and dictatorship;

    ▪ as human rights advocates, we respect and protect human rights and make every effort to campaign for

    their fulfillment;

    ▪ as environmental stewards, we take care of all creation;

    ▪ as sensible consumers, we live in simplicity;

    ▪ as servant-leaders, we act on our deep desire to help others;

    ▪ as healers and bridge-builders, we make sure to achieve our aims through non-violence; and,

    ▪ as prophets and preachers, we do our best to proclaim the good news.

     

    So, what is the LBAS SPIRITUALITY OF STEWARDSHIP?

    The LBAS SPIRITUALITY OF STEWARDSHIP is simply living the LBAS core values as one community. Spirituality of Stewardship is the core values reflected in our organizational structures, mechanisms, processes, manuals, and decisions. It is the core values in each one of us ALIVE as we live our daily lives as students, academic personnel, academic non-teaching personnel, non-academic personnel, maintenance and security personnel. It is the core values manifested in our relationships with parents, other stakeholders, and the surrounding community. It is the core values articulated in our encounter with knowledge and information, science and technology, and the environment. It is the core values expressed in our engagement with, and attachment to, the national and global community.

  • Stewardship in a Continuing Global Economic Crisis

     

    by: Romel Obinario

    Stewardship and the LBAS Themes through the Years

     

    LBAS is cognizant of the fact that the world we live in today is not an ideal world. A world where poverty and inequality exists; where people are denied their economic, political, cultural, and social rights; where wanton destruction of the environment prevails; and where justice and peace are still elusive dreams, is simply not the world we should be living in.

    LBAS believes that this world should be transformed. And so, since its tenth foundation anniversary celebration in 2007, LBAS has joined the participants of the World Social Forum in their battle cry “Another World is Possible.” Along this battle cry was formulated the themes of the past school years. In SY 2009 – 2010, the institution’s theme was “Making a Better World Possible through Gender-Fair Education.” This was followed by “Making a Better World Possible through Democracy Building and Human Rights Education” in SY 2010 – 2011, and “Making a Better World Possible through a Spirituality of Stewardship” in SY 2011 – 2012.

    In the process of celebrating and reflecting on the themes, the Community realized that underlying our commitment to, and all our actions in support of, making a better world possible is STEWARDSHIP.

    Stewardship is the careful and responsible management of something entrusted to one’s care. In religious terms, it is receiving God’s gifts gratefully, cherishing and tending them in a responsible and accountable manner, sharing them in justice and love with all, and returning them with increase to the Lord.

    Stewardship is the assumption of responsibility for the welfare of the world. It is the inclination which leads some part of the world to care for the whole. For LBAS, stewardship is the mantle under which all our core values, or causes – competence and creativity; personal and social responsibility; national pride and internationalism; democracy and human rights; care for the environment and simple lifestyle; faith and spirituality – are  “operationalized” and given meaning.

    Stewardship and the LBAS Themes through the Years

     

    The global economic crisis has a profound impact on the LBAS Community. For the LBAS personnel, they may not be affected by the jobs crisis, but their incomes are surely being eroded by the rising prices of basic commodities and services. They may not be living with just $1.25 a day, but that does not mean they enjoy very comfortable lives.

    For the parents, the GEC may affect their livelihood or sources of income. The shrinking of the global labor market may affect families who depend on OFWs for their survival. Employed parents may suffer from retrenchment or diminished salaries, or business owners may face closures, on account of a depressed export market or reduced foreign and local investment. This in turn may affect LBAS enrollment as parents may opt to send their children to private schools that charge less or to the public sector.

    The broader implications are hard to quantify, but the underlying message is to face the challenges that the GEC has wrought and look for alternatives that will have a positive impact on the lives of Filipinos and people around the world.

    Stewardship in a Continuing Global Economic Crisis

     

    How can the LBAS Community respond to the Global Economic Crisis?  We respond to the global economic crisis by performing our role as stewards for a better world.

     

    As stewards, we know the meaning of life – and make real sacrifices to make the world a better place – making our own lives better in the process. We assume responsibility for the welfare of the world.

     

    It is stewardship that compels us to respond to the continuing global economic crisis, thus out theme for School Year 2012 – 2013 – Stewardship in a Continuing Global Economic Crisis.

    As stewards, we need to learn more about the global economic crisis, trace its roots, understand its implications, and find solutions to the crisis. Once we reach a critical understanding of the GEC, we need to share what we know to our students. After all, they, too, are victims of the crisis. Further, they will one day become the leaders of companies, communities, the country, and the world. They need to be aware of the world’s problems and become caring enough so that they will also contribute to making a better world possible.

    As stewards, we need to join hands with the Filipino people who are still suffering from the clutches of poverty and are struggling for the recognition of their economic, political, cultural, and social rights. We need to join hands with the peoples of the world, the so-called 99%, in defining and forging an alternative paradigm to the neoliberal framework of global economic development that has brought on the GEC in the first place. Their struggle is also our struggle, and their advancement is also our advancement.

     

     

     

     

    Stewardship in a Continuing Global Economic Crisis

     

    Stewardship is at the core of our core values. When we say we are stewards for a better world, we mean that we are STEWARDS:

    •  for our students, our co-employees, and for our own lives;

    •  for our country and our people;

    •  for democracy and human rights;

    •  for the poor in life and in spirit;

    •  for the world and the international community;

    •  for the environment; and,

    •  for our faith and our church.

     

    We perform different stewardship roles. Here are just some examples of the multitude of roles we can play as Belairian stewards:

    •  as competent and creative students and employees, we strive to be the best in our fields;

    •  as consummate artists, we assert our national identity through the things we create;

    •  as nationalists and freedom fighters, we endeavor to protect and defend our hard-won freedom;

    •  as diplomats and bridge-builders, we make every effort to work for prosperity and world peace;

    •  as defenders of democracy, we struggle to oppose tyranny and dictatorship;

    •  as human rights advocates, we respect and protect human rights and make every effort to campaign for their fulfillment;

    •  as environmental stewards, we take care of all creation;

    •  as sensible consumers, we live in simplicity;

    •  as servant-leaders, we act on our deep desire to help others;

    •  as healers and bridge-builders, we make sure to achieve our aims through non-violence; and,

    •  as prophets and preachers, we do our best to proclaim the good news.

     

    Indeed, we are Belairian stewards working to make a better world is possible!

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(049) 541-0404, (049) 541-0403

The Laguna BelAir township is not just a perfect place to raise the kids. It offers them the promise of a bright future at the Laguna BelAir Science School, a special school that's just a bike away from home.